Survival of the Prepared

survivalpanda:

Camp Minima 1

standinthesunswiminthesea:

flyingbowhunter:

iowncoolshit:

Granfors Bruks Axes

http://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/

I really want one but they are $$$

Worth every penny

atac-wolfe:

.22 LR Ammo storage

Many people are constantly coming up with ways to carry ammo around in their Bug Out Bags. Some of the more popular ways I’ve seen either include mulitple mags, or shoving the ammo in an old (cleaned and dried) Gatorade bottle. The problems with these method are both the extra weight and bulkiness.
Fortunately there is an easier and less bulky way to keep a plethora of small caliber ammo handy in your bug out bag (or even your range bag as pictured above).

Paintball Pods
Yeah you heard correctly… anyone with prior experience in this sport knows what im talking about, for those that dont- you can find them on amazon HERE.
As someone with prior experience in this sport, if you do decide to go the way of the pod, i recommend going with a smoked or non-translucent plastic, as the clear have a tendency to crack with any extended amount of time in the sun.

In one 140rd paintball pod you can squeeze well over 500 rds depending on how many silica packs (if any) you decide to put in there. I can fit two of these pods in the front of my RUGER 10/22 Takedown Pack (pictured above).

Stay Prepared, Stay Safe & Happy Trails!

steampunkvehicles:

This is an amazing, absolutely unique, perfectly preserved Atom-age Nuclear Survival Kit from the 1960s. Made by Family Survival Service of San Francisco. Contains enough food and water to support one person for 10 days. “Contents Protected Against Radioactive Fallout” It’s all here! Comes with hot breakfasts (2 servings of Ralston, 3 servings of Farina), Hot Dinners (Macaroni & Cream, Chili & Beans, Spanish Rice, Cheese & Rice Casserole, & Vegetable Stew), twelve 12-oz cans of US Aqua drinking water, 10 servings of hot chocolate, A First Aid kit, A tiny folding stove with a can of Sterno, 2 dozen paper towels, 2 plastic cups, matches, candles, a can opener, silverware, a bag, and a book called We Will: Do-it-yourself Survival In The Atom Age, which contains a lot of ranting about the commies and Russians but doesn’t exactly address what you’re supposed to do ten days after the bomb drops and the skies are on fire but you’re out of Mac & Cream.Strikingly evocative of cold war paranoia. A must have for the apocalypse. A once-in-a-lifetime chance to own this piece of grim Americana. 
Atom Age Survival Kit at Accoutrement For The Gentleman

SO COOL!

steampunkvehicles:

This is an amazing, absolutely unique, perfectly preserved Atom-age Nuclear Survival Kit from the 1960s. Made by Family Survival Service of San Francisco. Contains enough food and water to support one person for 10 days. “Contents Protected Against Radioactive Fallout” It’s all here! Comes with hot breakfasts (2 servings of Ralston, 3 servings of Farina), Hot Dinners (Macaroni & Cream, Chili & Beans, Spanish Rice, Cheese & Rice Casserole, & Vegetable Stew), twelve 12-oz cans of US Aqua drinking water, 10 servings of hot chocolate, A First Aid kit, A tiny folding stove with a can of Sterno, 2 dozen paper towels, 2 plastic cups, matches, candles, a can opener, silverware, a bag, and a book called We Will: Do-it-yourself Survival In The Atom Age, which contains a lot of ranting about the commies and Russians but doesn’t exactly address what you’re supposed to do ten days after the bomb drops and the skies are on fire but you’re out of Mac & Cream.

Strikingly evocative of cold war paranoia. A must have for the apocalypse. A once-in-a-lifetime chance to own this piece of grim Americana.

Atom Age Survival Kit at Accoutrement For The Gentleman

SO COOL!

albotas:

Camp Like A Boss With The swissRoomBox Easy Tech

Dig camping, but don’t own a camper and hate leaving behind all the conveniences of the indoors? The swissRoomBox Easy Tech modular camping system has you covered with a sink, stove, dining table, and even a shower. It takes about 10 minutes to install, 2-5 minutes to set up, and doesn’t require any tools. Just one question: where do the TV and PS3 go?

ru-titley-knives:

Mk 4 variant of my personal Glint &Glow markers this time with US Coast Guard approved high Vis reflective orange made by 3M which is designed for long term Maritime uses .

Full specs here .

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserver?mwsId=SSSSSu7zK1fslxtUo8mZPx_9ev7qe17zHvTSevTSeSSSSSS—&fn=PB%20USCGFP.pdf

Custom knives , sheaths and gear from rtknives@hotmail.com

law66:

Suma Survival Tin Vs Tobacco Tin: Part One

The real difference on these two systems of creating a survival tin, before you even pick them up, is the price. The SUMA tin adopted by the SEALs rolls in at a good $60 empty. Shipping is also extra. The humble tobacco tin is a mere couple of pounds and is readily available. While the tobacco tin is armed with a fairly good seal, its certainly not perfectly air or water tight. The Suma, it has to be said is waterproof and to some extent can take immersion. The gasket seal around the lid is a separate item, allowing you to remove it if it needs replacing or while using the tin to cook.

So what about the finish. The humble tobacco tin will rust in time, its typically a basic varnish coating that will wear with use. Its perfectly functional, it can also be polished also to some extent making it a signal mirror. Its simple, delivers, is big enough to hold enough gear for most situations and packs away easily. Electrical tape can be used to hold it shut, and create a working seal to prevent water ingress.

The Suma tin is highest aircraft grade aluminium, hard anodised to give it a hard coating that resists everything. It cant rust, but its use over time will make it wear a little. The lid internally is covered with a reflective surface for signalling. Besides two milled slots in the lid for the velcro retention straps its an incredibly tight fitting lid. The box is hard enough to act as a shovel for digging, a tin for cooking or when loaded a method to beat a Harbour seal to death with. Then cook it!

In comparison when looking at size, the Suma tin is slightly thicker, narrower and not so long. It seems to fit the hand better if you need to carry it. When it comes to load out, they both carry the same kits. It just needs to be loaded differently on the more compact Suma to get it all in. The strange thing is that the Suma tin is carrying a Gerber Dime with the same kit as the tobacco tin. Theres a strange Tetris game going on but with some time and playing you can make it all work perfectly.

So which is the better tin? To be openly honest, the Suma tin is really nice. It truly is, the price did put me off but once you have it in your hand you can see why its so highly priced. The ability to boil water sterilises it of course, but a warm drink, even if its only water makes a difference when you are stuck and cold. The tobacco tin does not permit that. Neither does it lend itself to a digging tool to search for bait or to help affix ropes, create a fire pit etc. If it came down to the Harbour seal getting a bop on the head and I cant find a rock, the suma comes into its own. Slipping it into a sock might give you a last great act of defiance as you whirl it around to smack a bear also. Who knows you may get lucky and deter it. Hell, failing that it will choke on the tin and for satisfaction of that alone its got to be a worthy addition.

Next time I’ll share the contents of the tin so you can see a budget end kit in the tobacco tin, after that the Suma tin with the highend gear. Its as close as I can get to the official Seal Team kit, all in this tin, including that Gerber Dime in black.

Thats in Part Two.

containerspace:

Som brilliand ideas for 20ft containers by Michael Janzen from Tiny House Living

This is just a little design exploration for how one might finish out a shipping container as a home.  Some of the issues I’m noodling-through are:
Should a side door be cut into the container and how does that make the floor plan more flexible?
Should the bathroom be placed at one end or in the middle?
Should custom built-in beds be fabricated or can standard beds and bunk beds be used just as efficiently?
How many beds can be placed inside a 20-foot shipping container and still have space for a micro kitchen and bathroom?
Not sure where this design exploration is going yet, but I’m having fun thinking about what can fit inside the box.

containerspace:

Som brilliand ideas for 20ft containers by Michael Janzen from Tiny House Living

This is just a little design exploration for how one might finish out a shipping container as a home.  Some of the issues I’m noodling-through are:

  1. Should a side door be cut into the container and how does that make the floor plan more flexible?
  2. Should the bathroom be placed at one end or in the middle?
  3. Should custom built-in beds be fabricated or can standard beds and bunk beds be used just as efficiently?
  4. How many beds can be placed inside a 20-foot shipping container and still have space for a micro kitchen and bathroom?

Not sure where this design exploration is going yet, but I’m having fun thinking about what can fit inside the box.

gmsurvival:

itstactical:

Slick to Full Loadout: Building a Scalable and Modular Armor System

Finally getting to post this from the source.